Guide to Floral Terms and Phrases Used When Discussing Wedding Flowers


I'm guilty of this. I forget all the time when discussing wedding flowers that there are certain terms/words we use when explaining things to clients that if you don't work in our industry don't make sense at all. So here is a little guide to help from your local San Diego Wedding Florist. I hope it helps some...




FLORAL TERMS:


Belly Bar: There's a lot of words we use for this, but basically it's just the taller tables you'll have at your cocktail hour. You'll hear us talk about them if we're asking how many cocktail arrangements you'd like. Other names for the same thing: Belly Up Table, High Tops, High Boys, etc.


Bouts: This is an abbreviation we use often when talking about boutonnières (or in Europe more commonly called button holes), flowers for the men's lapel.


Chimneys: These are glass hurricanes for candles that are open on both ends so we can slide them over candles. Most venues require these so there is no open flames. Also called: sleeves, covers, hurricane.


Chimneys

COI: This acronym stands for Copy of Insurance. Venues will ask that your florist and other wedding vendors provide a COI before the day of your wedding.


Compote: A compote is a footed vase. You'll hear us using this term to describe our inventory available for your centerpieces.


Flip: This is a word we use to describe when we move ceremony arrangements to the reception, or when we have to change the space at a venue from ceremony to reception, like if you're having both in the same room.


Floral Foam: Floral foam is the green micro plastic bricks that florist sometimes use in arrangements to place flowers in. Here at Champagne Projects we do not use this because it is toxic to our health and the environment, which is why you'll see on our website or Instagram terms or hashtags like #foamfree.


Floral Frog or Pin Frog: No we are not using cute little amphibians in your arrangements, but rather Floral Frogs. Frogs are a type of Mechanics (see below) that we use to replace the aforementioned floral foam. These metal piece are placed at the bottom of centerpiece vessel and give us a place to stick our stems into so that the flower stay put. You can read more about this here on our Foam Free Blog.



Pin Frog

Hanging Installation: This phrase often confuses couples as yes we will come and put your arch pieces up, but an actual hanging installation is flowers, greenery or arrangements suspended from the ceiling, not just us being on site to install or hang things.


Imported: When we talk about imported flowers it's usually in reference to flower that are out of season. We are fortunate here in California to be able to source most our flowers from local farms, but if a certain flower only grows here in Spring or Fall for instance, that means it's growing elsewhere below the equator in the opposite season, so when we can't get it here we can import them.


Mechanics: Mechanics is the word we use to describe all the structures we use to create your arrangements to attach to things and hold the flowers in place, whether this be chicken wire for arches and/or centerpieces, or floral frogs, or any arch/structure we use as well to tapes and putties; basically all the behind the scenes things that you'll never see that create an illusion of flowers just magically existing or defying gravity.


Posy Bouquet: Posy is the term we use to describe petite bouquets with 3-5 blooms in them. They're cost efficient and still beautiful if you have a larger bridal party.

Photography by Kara Reynolds Photography | Florals by Le Champagne Projects

Satellite Arrangement: A satellite arrangement is a small arrangement that is usually used on a long rectangular table as a pair with one traditional centerpiece. So one on each side of the centerpiece to elongate the design and make the rectangular table look full.


Strike: Strike is the term we use to tell you we'll be coming back at the end of the night to clean up any remaining florals and collect all of our rentals. You may see this on a quote or in a wedding timeline.


Traditionally Wrapped: This phrase describes how we will wrap bouquets. Traditionally wrapped means wrapping around the stems to cover the tape with a ribbon. Alternatively, we can do a flowing ribbon where the ribbon trails off and is longer.


Photography by Mandy Ford Photography | Florals by Le Champagne Projects

Peace, love and flowers my friends!




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*Thank you to one of our favorite Coordinators Bea from Occasions by Bea Prescilla for her input here.



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